Egyptian Art

Papyrus Paintings depicting Egyptian Goddesses

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Egyptian Art of Ancient Egyptian Goddesses, many copied from original paintings found on the walls of tombs.

These beautiful works of art are available to purchase from Egyptian Dreams, a company specialising in supplying gifts from Ancient Egypt.



Hand Painted Papyrus of the Egyptian Goddess Hathor
Hand Painted Papyrus of Hathor Hand Painted Papyrus of Gods and Goddesses Hand painted papyrus of Amentet, Re-Horakhty, Horus and Hathor
Hand Painted Papyrus of Seti I and Hathor Hand Painted Papyrus of Isis, Ma'at, Horus and Hathor Hand Painted Papyrus of Osiris, the goddess Isis and the goddess Hathor.
Hand Painted Papyrus of Hathor's Blessing Hand Painted Papyrus of Egyptian Goddesses  

Hathor was the goddess of joy, motherhood, and love. She was also the goddess of music and dancing. Dead women were identified with Hathor, as men were identified with Osiris. Hathor is usually depicted entirely as a cow or as a beautiful, slender woman wearing a head-dress of a pair of cow's horns with a sun disc between them. Hathor was thought of as the mother of the pharaoh.

 


Hand Painted Papyrus of the Egyptian Goddess Maat
Hand Painted Papyrus of Maat Hand Painted Papyrus of Maat and Isis Hand Painted Papyrus of Winged Maat Hand Painted Papyrus of Isis, Ma'at, Horus and Hathor
Hand Painted Papyrus of Maat Hand Painted Papyrus of Winged Maat

Ma'at was the personification of the fundamental order of the universe, without which all of creation would perish. The primary duty of the pharaoh was to uphold this order by maintaining the law and administering justice. To reflect this, many pharaohs took the title "Beloved of Maat," emphasizing their focus on justice and truth. At any event in which something would be judged, Ma'at was said to be present, and her name would be invoked so that the judge involved would rule correctly and impartially. Ma'at's presence in all worlds was universal, and all the gods deferred to her.

Hand Painted Papyrus of Bastet
Hand Painted Papyrus of the Egyptian Goddess Bastet

Bastet, the cat goddess, was worshipped in the ancient city of Per-Bastet (Bubastis). Although Bastet was a local deity, she was of great importance to the kings of Egypt. Cat-like, she had both gentle and fierce aspects to her nature. To the ancient Egyptians, the cat epitomized the protective aspects of motherhood, so Bastet was honoured as one of the mothers of kings.

Hand Painted Papyrus of the Egyptian Goddess Isis
Hand Painted Papyrus of Egyptian Goddesses Hand Painted Papyrus of Isis and Nefertari Hand Painted Papyrus of Isis, Ma'at, Horus and Hathor
Hand Painted Papyrus showing Homage to Isis Hand Painted Papyrus of Isis Hand Painted Papyrus of Maat and Isis

Isis was a winged goddess who represented all that was visible, birth, growth, development and vigour. Having wings, she was a wind goddess. The kite was sacred to her, and she could transform herself into this bird at will. She brought the heavenly scent with her through the land, leaving lingering scenes of spices and flowers her wake. She brought fresh air with her into the underworld when she gave food to the dead. She represented both the life-giving spring winds of Egypt and the morning winds that hailed the arrival of the sun each day.

The ancient Egyptians saw Isis as a benevolent goddess, good and kind. Each pharaoh was her son and Isis loved all creatures like a mother. She was the chaste and devoted wife and as a result most highly regarded among the Egyptian gods. Isis was the daughter of Nut and Geb and the sister and wife of Osiris. Isis aided her husband during his reign as the king of Egypt and searched madly for his body after his death so that he might be given a proper burial. Isis conceived her son Horus either through magic or by resurrecting Osiris. Isis raised Horus in the papyri and lotus thickets of Chemmis, in the delta area of Lower Egypt to protect the child from his uncle Seth. Seth wanted to murder Horus, but Isis hid the child so that some day he might avenge his father’s death.


Hand Painted Papyrus of Re-Horakhty and Amentet Hand painted papyrus of Amentet, Re-Horakhty, Horus and Hathor
Hand Painted Papyrus of the Egyptian Goddess Amentet

Amentet was the Egyptian goddess and friend of the dead, and the personification of the Land of the West, 'Amenti'. It was she who welcomed the deceased to their new dwelling place in the netherworld. She was also a goddess who helped with the rebirthing process, and thus a goddess of fertility and rebirth, who regenerated the deceased with food and water.

She was depicted as a beautiful woman as wearing the standard of the west on her head, carrying a scepter and the ankh of life in her hands. She is occasionally seen as a winged goddess, when linked to the goddesses Isis and Nephthys. The standard of the west is usually a half circle sitting on top of two poles of uneven length, the longer of which is tied to her head by a headband. Often a hawk or an ostrich feather is seen sitting on top of the standard. Occasionally, she is shown wearing just the hawk on her head.

She was believed to live in a tree at the edge of the desert, a place where she could watch the gates to the underworld. She was often shown not only in tombs, but on coffins, being a goddess of the dead.


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